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What type of D&D (or fantasy) adventures do you prefer?

 Post subject: What type of D&D (or fantasy) adventures do you prefer?
PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 9:11 am 
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Unctuous Toady
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I think we have all played Dungeons & Dragons (or something similar). I want to use it as a point of reference. In a typical campaign a group of adventurers will probably go through all kinds of different adventures, whether store bought modules or adventures created by the GM. You will have dungeon crawls, mysteries, quests, political intrigues, military actions, etc.

What type of adventure do you enjoy the most (as player or GM)?


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The game designers themselves know these values are not realistic and they do not intend them to replace or invalidate the fluff. So let's get on with our lives and not fixate over the cosmic ramifications of game mechanics which we already know are streamlined for larger forces at the expense of detail.


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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 9:42 am 
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Master Gunner
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Well... One where there really is a sense of danger. One with a resourceful GM who can accept original ideas and not one of those that just have to screw up a great plan every time just because they feel like it. One that doesn't hold up the smart ass players and acknowledge that some people will get more experience points for doing something original. Gamesmasters that can improvise and cope if players want to ask about history or current affairs. A realistic world with a decent timeline and good background/fluff.

As a gamesmaster... Hm... Well, it helps if they players go beyond hack and slash. Most junior gamers that I ran into tend to focus on the combat aspect and lack any imagination.

Cthulu seemed really interesting when I first heard about it. The idea of generating a dark scary world full of mysteries. Whereas werewolf and vampire seemed to me to be just a kiddo imagination trip. Yay, I can fly, I can do weird things like rip cars apart... Great....

I think there should be an experience point system similiar to the Palladium fantasy rpg where failed skill use still gives experience. I might even add a system where people gain experience points just for different experiences, like the first time they fly or go into some magical underwater adventure. That and also the creation of a desire to visit libraries and tour the world, spend some time travelling and experiencing life on a ship for example. The current systems I've known are limited to killing.

And I would award experience points to players for having sex.


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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 11:58 am 
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kharille wrote:
I would award experience points to players for having sex.
IRL, or in the game? :twisted: :wink: :P

It's really hard for me to answer this question, because I _ran_ the perfect D&D game for just about 5 years... The players started at low levels, and as the game progressed, their adventures exposed them to a wider world than just the river valley where they started... At first, it _was_ just a dungeon crawl (modified from my memories of the D&D Red Box's "module")... but there was information and hooks and religiosity and dramatic tension from lots of different directions... It was a challenging, but extremely rewarding, game to run, and the players appreciated my efforts.

kharille -- I agree with the general points you raise. The GM *must* not be so committed to his "script" that it takes away the ability of the players to choose. Succinctly, if the GM is prepared, he can be surprised, but never at a loss for how his world would react to the players' actions.

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PostPosted: Fri May 19, 2006 12:52 pm 
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well, as a player in d&d, i prefer an adventure that mixes many things together. the ideal adventure starts because the players(characters) want to do it, not that the GM forces it down their throats. this can be due to any of the above listed social challenges (political, religious, etc.). during the course of play, players and the GM should take into consideration just why the characters are doing what they are doing, and role-play accordingly. if the role-playing aspect is always there, then an adventure should have a mixture of underground exploration, thrilling (and relevant) combat, hard decisions that impact the rest of the campaign, and all that good stuff. treasure and material rewards always take a back seat to the reward of a job well done and the experience of living in a vibrant, realistic world. though, often GM's will give treasure and items anyway.

side note- random encounters are the crutch of the unprepared GM. they are pointless and detract from the experience.

as a GM, my job is to create a backdrop for the character's story. that is, to create a world where things happen even when the characters decide not to do anything. example, the party decides not to follow a plot hook about an assassination plot against a ruler/guard captain/whatever. over the course of the week between game sessions i run a mini-adventure against myself to figure out if the plot succeeded or not. then, if the players ask about it or gather information, they hear rumors about what occurred.
this, of course, implies a lot of work behind the scenes, but really makes everything better in the long run. i've found that the best games are those where you can answer any and all questions the player's think about without having to look things up or think about it to much. that being said, during the week and during the game session, i don't really plan much ahead of time (unless it's a really important session). this is to prevent creating things that the players don't follow up or use. then, after the session, i look over my list of what happened and what i told them might happen, and work from that over the course of the next week.
after all that, i try to run games that i would enjoy playing in. to make sure that this happens, i usually create a background character that goes with the party and helps out from time to time. this character is always a commoner, and usually has some plot behind him. so, if i gauge the amount of fun i have role-playing the commoner (usually a moss-farmer), i can have an idea of if the players are having a good time without having to ask them. believe it or not, this actually works pretty well, and the players in my campaigns always love role-playing with the tag-along commoner for some reason :D. to summarize this paragraph, i try to run games that play like the above statements of what i enjoy as a player.

man, i can't wait to find a group of gamers here in alabama (just moved) so i can get back to GMing and playing games. especially exalted.


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PostPosted: Thu May 25, 2006 10:28 am 
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Simply put, I like games that make sense.
Where the characters have believeable motivation for what they're doing, where the opposition has believeable motivation for what they're doing, where actions have reactions, where NPCs act sensibly, where the words 'it's magic' are never used in an attempt to explain something that doesn't add up...

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 7:32 am 
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I like some sort of realism (believability), heroes who aren't supermen, and not to be surrounded by a table full of powergamers. I like a good storyline, but I don't like running in a 12 hour session, where all I get to do is talk and solve puzzles. Give me a fair amount of action, as well. I like fighting enemies that aren't always huge powerful monnsters, but usually other "adventuring" parties.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 am 
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As a player I like a nice mix of problem solving & combat.

As a GM I liked to put together a good story that usually resulted in a climactic battle, alas,I was sometimes hamstrung. One of my groups operated under the credo of "If force doesnt work, try MORE force!" So adventures that had grand plots & schemes were generally lost on them. :D

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 11:27 pm 
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for me the story makes the game.
i also like a bit of comedy put into it by the GM.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 9:04 am 
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Cor DM!
I almost forgot COMEDY! Love it 8)

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 2:55 pm 
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I think that humor or comedy in games is essential. But I don't think that it is something that can be really planned for. It works best if it arrises organically from play.

Maybe something amusing happens when role-playing an NPC. Rarely to pre-written gags or "funny" encounters workout as funny as planned.

Sometimes player characters or NPCs develope some unique or distinctive trait, habit or quirk that provides amusement. These things work well, because it helps remind players that the game is not all about completing dire quests and advancing levels.

I played in one DnD game where a tough and gruff dwarven fighter had a debilitating fear of water. The player was a good role-player as was the whole group. The DM had told us that the advanture would eventually end up in Deep Earth. That meant there would be lots of subterrenaen places with running water, grottos, sunken Aboleth cities, etc. That led to a lot of great role-playing and also humor from the dwarf player, the other players and the DM via various NPCs.


Truckler ("Nobody said anything about fording a damned river.")

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Venator wrote:
The game designers themselves know these values are not realistic and they do not intend them to replace or invalidate the fluff. So let's get on with our lives and not fixate over the cosmic ramifications of game mechanics which we already know are streamlined for larger forces at the expense of detail.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 12, 2006 4:37 am 
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Master Gunner
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Humour, yeah its fun but it can completely ruin an atmosphere. There was this one time a few years back where some players where guarding a caravan in a town. Some noises heard from one of the upper floors of the inn. The thief clambered on the wall unknown to the other players but was spotted. When they called out the response was:

"*$&$!!! Can't a guy watch a man discipline his wife in
peace!?!!?"

At the time it was good....

One thing I love about the thief is how they can really take unconventional ways around obstacles. Sort of guy that can't use the doors like the other more cooperative players. When I play the thief the gamesmaster struggles to contain what I do....


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:14 pm 
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Truckler wrote:
I think that humor or comedy in games is essential. But I don't think that it is something that can be really planned for. It works best if it arrises organically from play.

Maybe something amusing happens when role-playing an NPC. Rarely to pre-written gags or "funny" encounters workout as funny as planned.


Good point!
Pre-scripted comedic bits usually just come off as lame & contrived.

"Heh-heh and then the one legged orc said..." :roll:

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:19 pm 
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"the one-legged orc said 'take my wife.... no, please, take her'"


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:22 pm 
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Truckler wrote:
I think that humor or comedy in games is essential. But I don't think that it is something that can be really planned for. It works best if it arrises organically from play.

Maybe something amusing happens when role-playing an NPC. Rarely to pre-written gags or "funny" encounters workout as funny as planned.



this is true, but not all GMs can take the comedy that arises naturally from the game and use it to furthur the plot or add stuff/quirks to the game.

i remember one time my mates character was throwing a coin to a rumour monger and scored a critical hit that did 3 damage and knocked the dude out!! funny as.


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