Login |  Register |  FAQ
   
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

The best way to determine results...

 Post subject: The best way to determine results...
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 8:41 am 
Offline
Gunner
Gunner
User avatar

Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2006 12:10 pm
Posts: 131
Hi there.

Golly, it's been a while since I was last here ain't it :). Anyway, a few days ago I got into a small discussion with one of my friends about what was the best way to determine results in a wargame.

Is it the good old fashioned '4+ 6+' method (ala Warhammer)?

Or maybe using opposed rolls or target numbers (Rezolution and Warmachine respectively) is the best way.

Is it best to roll against a certain level of difficulty (like Confrontation) or to roll under a particular characteristic (Infinity)?

This discussion really got me thinking, and I thought it would be interesting to come on here and see which method you guys prefer? (Personally I prefer the more simple methods)

Looking forward to what has to be said.

Peace.

cupcake.

_________________
:twisted: I am the cupcake. I like blue. :twisted:


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:59 am 
Offline
Master Sergeant
Master Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 25, 2005 7:44 am
Posts: 1675
Location: Australia
I say, depends.
Firstly on the level of detail within the game, and secondly on the situation.
But over all, rolling fewer dice and fewer types of dice is preferable, so long as you are maintaining the desired level of detail.

Using shooting as an example, my preferred method is to use a single die roll for each shot to determine whether it hits, based on the attacker's skill, modified by the relevant factors, such as cover, target movement, weapon type, range, etc. So based on the shooter's skill, you will have a base required to hit roll, like 7 or less on a D10, or 3+ on a D6, etc., which is then modified.

In some situations, using opposed rolls is appropriate, say for close combat. But for shooting, I have always disliked systems that give the target a chance to actively defend itself from being hit.

_________________
Warhammer 40,000 5th edition
The least worst rules for 40K.

The purpose of writing is to inflate weak ideas, obscure poor reasoning, and inhibit clarity.
With a little practice, writing can be an intimidating and impenetrable fog, behind which halftruths and untruths can frolic and procreate unmolested.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:36 pm 
Offline
Rogue-Psyker
Rogue-Psyker
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2005 12:31 pm
Posts: 1580
Location: Pech, Ultima Segmentum
I will also have to say that it depends on how you want the system to work. I don;t know that any method is inherently better or worse than another as long as you can get the odds and the level of detail you want. Opposed rolls seem like one of the more time consuming methods and would be undesirable in a mass combat game like modern 40K, but it might be okay in a small skirmish.

Have you every played any edition of the Shadowrun RPG? It has odd dice rolling mechanics that have changed either slightly or radically in every revision of the game (currently 4th Edition). The game mechanics really give the game an unusual feel of its own, even if you might have to roll 12d6 or more to shoot a gun. As in this example, having distinctive, if odd, game mechanics might have benefits of its own.

The main dice rolling mechanic I like to complain about in some games (mainly RPGs) is games in which the player/character has little or no control over the results. For example, in d20 system games, low level characters have tiny little bonuses and the big random dice really decides what happens and the character's skill has little to do with it. I have not played Infinity but I notice it also uses d20. Do the models have big enough bonuses that their abilities really matter, or is it all a dice game?

_________________
"Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do." - Voltaire
"It is to be expected that we will run out of fossil fuels before we run out of optimists, who are, along with fools and madmen, a renewable resource." - Dmitry Orlov


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 2:00 pm 
Offline
Private
Private

Joined: Tue May 24, 2005 5:28 am
Posts: 75
I used to have an open mind towards all the various possible die rolling methods. Until the 90s, that is. After suffering through dozens of wacky, untested, and completely irrational rolling methods, I've become a complete die rolling bigot. I have definate opinions about what one better than another. Here's my manifesto ...


1- For the human brain, adding is easier than subracting, which is easier than multiplying, which is easier than divided. Thus a die rolling method that uses only addition is superior to one that uses subraction which is superior to one that uses multiplication and division. Fortunately, you don't see that many games using division anymore. The new RQ is the only one I can think of.

2- Roll High is better than Roll Low. This is mainly for three reason. First, Roll High makes it easier to scale bigger and better. You can just add +1 to your "skill" to make a better fighter or to whatever Target Number you need to make tougher armor. Secondly, Roll Low tends to use subtraction. Finally, with a Roll High versus a TN, I, as gamemaster/ref, don't need to tell the player the difficulty nor do I even actually need to know it until after the player rolls his die. I can add up all the modifiers while the player is adding up his roll and if he rolls really high or really low I don't need to know the exact TN anyway.

3- Roll 1 die per action. The reason you don't see many large battles in GURPS is that if rolling for 6 dudes, you can't just roll 18d6 and see the result, you need to roll seperately which wastes valuable time. Using one die per action means you won't get bogged down during large fights.

4-Use the same die regardless of the action. Not only does this prevent the problem of finding the right die or rolling the wrong one. It makes it much easier for newbies; they don't have to search a character sheet or stat line before they roll. This allows a player with a minimal knowledge of the game system to get into the action as the GM/ref/opponent can interpret the die roll for him until he is comfortable.

That's leads us to the ultimate die rolling method:

1dX + Y >= TN

I know it's boring but it works.


Aaron


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

cron

Powered by phpBB ® Forum Software © phpBB Group